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“This is how opening batsmen should bat”: Nick Compton pleased with Dean Elgar and Sarel Erwee’s solid techniques at Lord’s

Dixit Bhargav
|Thu Aug 18 2022


Nick Compton pleased with Dean Elgar and Sarel Erwee’s solid techniques: The former English batter has appreciated the South African batters.

During the second day of the first Test of the ongoing South Africa’s tour of England at Lord’s, South Africa opening batters Dean Elgar (47) and Sarel Erwee negated any chances of losing wickets against the new ball on the back of an 85-run opening stand.

Had it not been for an unfortunate dismissal, Elgar would’ve easily completed his 23rd Test half-century. Erwee, on the other hand, managed to cross the 50-run mark in his first-ever Test innings in England.

Chasing England’s first innings total of 165, Elgar and Erwee’s partnership ensured that the visitors score half the runs without losing any wicket.

With less than a dozen runs remaining for South Africa to gain first innings lead, they would want to make the most of their remaining eight wickets. A monumental partnership or two here will have it in it to bat the hosts out of this match.

Nick Compton pleased with Dean Elgar and Sarel Erwee’s solid techniques

Former England batter Nick Compton took to his social media platform Twitter handle to express pleasure at watching Elgar and Erwee bat against the likes of James Anderson and Stuart Broad.

Compton, who himself opened the batting in 18 out of 30 Test innings for England, seemed to be hinting at the English batters needing to learn from their South African counterparts.

Notwithstanding their glorious success in this format in this international summer, England are yet to make peach with their opening woes. While the current team management appears to be backing Alex Lees and Zac Crawley, it is no hiding that out of form opening batters are a significant worry for England.


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